sábado, 13 de abril de 2024   inicia sesión o regístrate
 
Protestante Digital

 
 

Walking through the Psalms

Every Psalm points to God’s character, which is an excellent focus for your heart.

BIBLICAL PREACHING AUTOR 108/Peter_Mead 14 DE JULIO DE 2022 11:38 h
Photo: [link]Kelly Sikkema[/link], Unsplash CC0.

During 2022 I have been enjoying a slow walk through the book of Psalms. I have been working through the book one Psalm at a time.



I have shared the journey via YouTube and sought to convey a detail and a point of application from each Psalm to help others enjoy reading the Psalm.



As we are now at the halfway point in the year, I thought I would pull together some reflections:



1. Slowing down and pondering a Psalm allows you to appreciate the artistic crafting contained within a Psalm



For instance, if I look at the short five verses of Psalm 70, I notice the key terms repeated in the first and last verses: haste, O God, deliver me; O LORD, help me.



Actually, while I knew that Psalms can give a sense of completion by using similar terminology at the beginning and end, I have been surprised by how often that occurs.



And the use of inclusio, or “bookends”, is only one of many types of artistry to be found in the Psalms.



2. Scribbling on the text of a Psalm allows you to notice the flow of thought more easily



Again, sticking with Psalm 70 as a simple example, there are two movements within the body of the Psalm.



In verses 2-3, the repetition of “Let them…” shows David’s concern regarding those opposing him. He wants God to deal with them.



Then verse 4 has the repetition of “May…”, which points to the positive request and anticipation. David knows that seeking God leads to good for his people. Judgment of them; the blessing for us.



3. Study intensity does not preclude devotional impact



I remember Gordon Fee writing about the need for exegesis and devotion.



He noted that just as a church does not need an exegetically precise pastor who is lacking in devotional warmth as he studies his Bible in sermon preparation, the people in the pew should not be devotionally warm while being exegetically imprecise in their personal Bible times.



Sometimes we fall into the trap of separating technical study from devotional reading.



But when I scribble on a printout of a Psalm, note the structure, the parallelisms, the imagery, and even when I turn to a technical commentary to probe a specific issue, none of this precludes the devotional impact of the Psalm.



The end goal should be that the Psalm speaks to my heart, affects my life, and potentially gets shared as an encouragement to someone else.



4. Simplicity in Psalm study is sometimes where we find the treasure



Some of us set the bar very high for our Bible engagement. We think we have to plumb the depths and find high-level technical insights in every study.



But in Psalm 70, the bottom line is straightforward.



David starts the final verse with an extra line before returning to the terms that bring the Psalm full circle as they repeat the opening ideas from verse 1. What is the additional line? “But I am poor and needy.”



The enemies of David need to be judged. God’s people have reason to rejoice in God. David is poor and needy. So, hasten, O God, deliver and help me. The bottom line that we can take away? “I need God.”



It is not high-level original thought, and I will not get a PhD for noticing it, but it might be just the thought I need as I walk with God today.



5. Short Psalms do not have to mean brief study



Psalm 70 is just five verses long. It is essentially a repetition of the final verses of Psalm 40. So, with it being brief and recently studied, does that make it a quick cursory study?



It does not have to mean that at all! God’s Word can always be a fruitful chew! I understand the benefits of a quick read and simple study – we all need those too.



But there is nothing to say that a brief Psalm must not linger longer than a few minutes in our minds and hearts. Meditate on God’s Word, day and night – that even sounds like a healthy Psalms idea!



6. Some Psalms point overtly to Jesus; every Psalm points to God’s character



Some Psalms clearly point beyond themselves to the coming greater son of David. In other Psalms, the connection to the coming Messiah is less overt.



But every Psalm points to God’s character, which is an excellent focus for your heart. It is never too big a step from God’s goodness, grace, mercy, and blessing to the fulfilment of God’s great plan in the coming of Jesus.



You don’t have to force a detail to make the link explicit. But do make sure you are enjoying the God who is revealing himself through this beautiful book.



7. Say what you see – the Psalms ask to be prayed or sung



As you read through Psalms, you may find a tune already in your mind.



For example, Psalm 34 and Psalm 68 seem to strike up several songs because of songs sung in my church growing up or today.



Other Psalms may feel very unfamiliar in their wording. Yet, often they offer the very words my heart wants to be praying to God.



That feeling of profound contemporary relevance is not rare when spending time in Psalms.



So let the words work in your heart and then let the words work on your lips, whether you are singing God’s praise or crying out to God in prayer.



8. Share what you see – the Psalms are asking to be passed along



There is something incredibly transferable about the blessing of Psalms. The simplicity of application, the power of the imagery, the brevity of the written context – it all means you have something to share with others in conversation or with friends via text message.



Psalms is a book that joins you in the most secret place of suffering or struggle, and yet it is a book that can spill out to others in the everyday activities of life. Share what you are blessed to see.



What do you appreciate about the book of Psalms? What have I missed?



Peter Mead is mentor at Cor Deo and author of several books. This article first appeared on his blog Biblical Preaching. 


 

 


0
COMENTARIOS

    Si quieres comentar o

 



 
 
ESTAS EN: - - - Walking through the Psalms
 
 
Síguenos en Ivoox
Síguenos en YouTube y en Vimeo
 
 
RECOMENDACIONES
 
PATROCINADORES
 

 
AEE
PROTESTANTE DIGITAL FORMA PARTE DE LA: Alianza Evangélica Española
MIEMBRO DE: Evangelical European Alliance (EEA) y World Evangelical Alliance (WEA)
 

Las opiniones vertidas por nuestros colaboradores se realizan a nivel personal, pudiendo coincidir o no con la postura de la dirección de Protestante Digital.